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Social Studies

2017 Social.JPG

Social Studies provides opportunities for students to develop the attitudes, skills, and knowledge that will enable them to become engaged, active, informed, and responsible citizens. It is an issues-focused and inquiry-based interdisciplinary subject that draws upon history, geography, ecology, economics, law, philosophy, political science, and other social science disciplines. It fosters students’ understanding of, and involvement in, practical and ethical issues that face their communities and humankind. Ultimately, Social Studies is integral to the process of enabling students to develop an understanding of who they are, what they want to become, and how to improve the society they want to live in.


To accommodate the wide array of student needs, the Social Studies curriculum is divided into two main streams:

STRAND 1 (-1)

For students pursuing careers that will emphasize history, geography, ecology, economics, law, philosophy, political science and/or other social science disciplines. This stream (-1) requires very strong reading and writing skills and will require the students to be ready for challenging essay writing, challenging readings, and challenging source analysis that requires high level critical thinking skills. Areas in the field of science, technology, engineering and other technical programs do not require a -1 completion for admission.

STRAND 2 (-2)

For students pursuing careers that will not focus on the disciplines noted in the -1 stream.
Note: To receive a high school diploma, students must complete either Social 30-1 or 30-2. As well both the -1 and -2 streams can be used towards achieving a Rutherford Scholarship.

AUXILIARY PROGRAMS

SOCIAL STUDIES HONOURS PROGRAM

The Honours program is differentiated by an advanced level of critical analysis; it is for students who are passionate about the social sciences. Ultimately, it seeks to augment the regular curriculum and challenge students without increasing the difficulty of assessment.

CANADIAN STUDIES PROGRAM

The Canadian Studies course has been designed to meet the needs of English Language Learners in Grades 10 and 11, who have recently arrived in Canada and need to develop their language knowledge of Canada before participating in the Social Studies 10 curriculum. To be enrolled in Canadian Studies, a student must be at a Level 1, 2, or 3 English Language Proficiency.


COURSES OFFERED

GRADE 10 


Social Studies 10-1
Students will explore multiple perspectives on the origins of globalization and the local, national and international impacts of globalization on lands, cultures, economies, human rights and quality of life. Students will examine the relationships among globalization, citizenship and identity to enhance skills for citizenship in a globalizing world. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to examine the effects of globalization on peoples in Canada and throughout the world, including the impact on Aboriginal and Francophone communities. 

Social Studies 10-2
Students will explore historical aspects of globalization as well as the effects of globalization on lands, cultures, human rights and quality of life. Students will explore the relationships among globalization, citizenship and identity. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to examine the effects of globalization on peoples in Canada and other locations, including the impact on Aboriginal and Francophone communities. Students will develop skills to respond to issues emerging in an increasingly globalized world. 

Social Studies 10-1 Honours


GRADE 11


Social Studies 20-1
Students will explore the complexities of nationalism in Canadian and international contexts. They will study the origins of nationalism and the influence of nationalism on regional, international and global relations. The infusion of multiple perspectives will allow students to develop understandings of nationalism and how nationalism contributes to the citizenship and identities of peoples in Canada. 

Social Studies 20-2
Students will examine historical and contemporary understandings of nationalism in Canada and the world. They will explore the origins of nationalism as well as the impacts of nationalism on individuals and communities in Canada and other locations. Examples of nationalism, ultranationalism, supranationalism and internationalism will be examined from multiple perspectives. Students will develop personal and civic responses to emergent issues related to nationalism. 

Social Studies 20-1 Honours

GRADE 12


Social Studies 30-1
Students will explore the origins and complexities of ideologies and examine multiple perspectives regarding the principles of classical and modern liberalism. An analysis of various political and economic systems will allow students to assess the viability of the principles of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. 

Social Studies 30-2
Students will examine the origins, values and components of competing ideologies. They will explore multiple perspectives regarding relationships among individualism, liberalism, common good and collectivism. An examination of various political and economic systems will allow students to determine the viability of the values of liberalism. Developing understandings of the roles and responsibilities associated with citizenship will encourage students to respond to emergent global issues. 

Social Studies 30-1 Honours

CANADIAN STUDIES

Canadian Studies 15

Canadian Studies 25

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 20

(DUAL ENROLLMENT)
An opportunity for students to complete Psychology at St. Francis Xavier and receive credit from Post Secondary institution.

The objectives of the 3-credit courses in psychology are designed to develop within the student the skills and understandings that make it possible for more effective living in our complex environment. The student’s attention will focus on the scientific approach to understanding human behaviour so that he or she may appreciate more fully the reasons that underlie one’s own acts and those of one’s fellows.