Sign In
opener


september.jpg

FLUENCY:

Echo reading - You read one line, and have the child echo the same line immediately after. As your child's reading improves, increase the number of lines read at one time. Ask your child to follow the print by using their finger to make sure the words are followed with their eyes.

COMPREHENSION:

Make Connections to what you're reading. Whether you're reading aloud to your child, or they are reading aloud to you, making connections is a great way to work on comprehending what they read. In school we focus on three kinds of connections: text-to-text, text-to-self, and text-to-world.

Ask your child:

Does this story remind you of another book we've read? How are they similar?
How is this character like you? How is this situation like one you have experienced?
How is this like something that happened in real life? How is this like something we heard on the news?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Play board games. Scrabble or Boggle are specifically good for building vocabulary and spelling, but most games include reading opportunities, including kid versions of Trivial Pursuit, Monopoly, and Clue.

Collect trading cards. There are card series to appeal to most interests, from sports to space travel, Yu-Gi-Oh! to Beanie Babies. Most include facts that encourage kids to read more about their hobbies.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Bite your tongue most of the time. If your child is making it through most words, but doing it at a snail's pace, be patient and let her carry on. She needs the practice. Frequent interruptions can interfere with comprehension (and the pleasure of reading).


october.jpg

FLUENCY:

Sight words - Children who have a large vocabulary of sight words have an advantage. Practice sight words from the Fry list (available from your teacher). Write each word on two index cards. Play Go Fish, Old Maid, or Memory. Quiz your child with flashcards.

COMPREHENSION:

Questioning - Proficient readers are always asking questions while they read. Questions help students clarify and deepen understaning of the text they are reading.

Before Reading - Have your child think about what predictions they have for the story. What do they think the story is about?

During Reading - Have your child think of questions to ask that begin with "I wonder..." or ask about information that may br confusing. Then, determine if the answer can be found in the text, the picture, with prior knowledge, by researching or by making an inference.

After Reading - Give your child the opportunity to ask any clarifying questions about the story.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Make Cards. Have your child make her own cards for holidays, birthdays, party invitations, and thank-yous. Help her write a personal message to each recepient.

Write messages for your child. Even if you spend hours together in the same room, there are many reasons to write to your child. Drop a letter in her school bag or e-mail her a joke she can forward to her friends. Post a list of chores on the refrigerator and write family news or appointments on a wall calendar.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Speak up for sense. An exception to the stay-mum rule: Gently correct your child if he alters the meaning of a sentence by skipping or substituting an important word.


november.jpg

FLUENCY:

Re-reading - Student benefit from reading stories over and over. The Dr. Seuss books are great for this, though any favourite book, words to a song or poem will do. Try reading using different voices for the characters, or in silly voices.

COMPREHENSION:

Visualizing - Mental pictures are the cinema unfolding in your mind that make reading three-dimensional. Visualization helps readers engage with text in ways that make it personal and memorable. Readers adapt their images as they continue to read.

As you read aloud to your child, have them stop and make a mental picture of an aspect of the story. They can share what they visualize.

Ask you child what they imagine as you read. Try to incoporate the five senses.

What do you hear? Smell? See? Feel? Taste?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Learn how to... Is there something your child would realy like to do, such as perform magic tricks or add sequins to her jeans? Encourage her to find out how by reading about it. She can read instructions in do-it-yourself kits or download information from the Web, them look for related books.

Take a road trip. Write down travel directions and have your child serve as navigator when you drive.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Help with stumpers. If your child encounters a new, difficult word that is key to understanding the sentence or passage he's reading, or that recurs frequently, step in to pronounce and define it for him.


december.jpg

FLUENCY:

Books on Tape - These can be a great way to provide examples of fluent reading. When using a taped story, make sure your child has the book at hand, adn have them follow along with their finger or read along to help with fluency. Have your child tape their own stories and evaluate their reading for fluency.

Making Inferences is usually referred to as "reading between the lines". This strategy involves:

  • Formating a best guess using evidence - context clues, picture clues, etc.
  • Making predictions
  • Drawing conclusions
  • Finding meaning of unknown words
  • Ask: What do you think the means" Why would the character do that?

Put on a play. You can perform the play for a special celebration or family party. Help your child find an appealing script or create on together based on a favourite movie. Print out copies, recruit other children or family members to act, and make costumes. Remind your child that he must memorize his lines by reading them over and over.Tips for Listening to Your Child Read:

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Answer appeals. When she ask for help, give it. Encourage her to figure words out on her own, but if she's genuinely stumped, come to her aid so she doesn't get frustrated.


january.jpg

FLUENCY:

Memorize a Poem-Find a favorite poem that you and your child enjoy. Shel Silverstein is a favorite author for many children. Read and reread the poem until it is memorized. Focus on expression, phrasing, and reading at an appropriate pace.

COMPREHENSION:

Determining Importance: People are bombarded daily with information. Knowing the purpose for reading helps determine what's important. Reader's need to distinguish between:

  • Fiction and nonfiction
  • Important from unimportant information

Activities:

  • Ask your child to think of another title for the story (it should have to do with the main idea)
  • Try to recall 3-5 facts after reading
  • Write a list of important words relating to the story or information

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Get a magazine subscription or check out magazines from the library. Highlights for Children, My Big Back Yard, Chickadee, Discovery Kids, National Geographic Kids, Ranger Rick, and Sports Illustrated Kids are magazines that are popular amongst children 6-9 years old.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Encore! When he finishes a passage or a story, ask him to read it again. Your interest is a confidence-booster, and the extra practice with familiar text will also boost both his skills and his self-esteem.


february.jpg

FLUENCY:

Expressive Reading - Find a song or poem that your child enjoys. Have him read the lyrics or words with as much expression as possible. Think about which words need emphasis. Look carefully and determine what kinds of punctuation could go in the song or poem (if it's not there already). Use the punctuation to help determine how to read the song or poem.

COMPREHENSION:

Making Predications helps your child engage in the material and keeps him interested.

Before Reading ask your child what they think the story is about. Have them look at the cover, do a "picture walk" through the pages, examine the table of contents, maps, diagrams and features. What does he think will happen in the story?

During Reading have your child continually think about what will happen next. It's okay if the prediction is incorrect. It's okay to revise predictions as the story continues.

After Reading determine if the predications were correct. Remember, it's okay if they weren't!

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Be a drama queen. When you're the one doing the reading, use lots of expression. Really put on a show! This will encourage your child to do the same when she reads. If she can, you'll know she's understanding the words she's reading, and not simply parroting them mindlessly.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Plan an event. For example, have your child help plan a party or trip. They can look in catalogues or travel guides for ideas for the event. Have them create lists of important things they need to buy or bring along.


march.jpg

FLUENCY:

If you have practiced sight words and done fluency work with your child, but they continue to stumble over the same words or read word-by-word with simple texts, please speak with your teacher. There may an issue that needs further investigation and considerations.

COMPREHENSION:

Summarizing the text in their own words clears up language issues. Retelling challenges them to aim for complete retention. Summarization allows students to discriminate between the main ideas and the minor details. Ask your child:

  • During reading, note the main ideas or events
  • At the end of chapters or sections, review the information or story. Note the main ideas or events and the details that support them.
  • After reading, retell or summarize the text. Focus on the important points, and support them with relevant details.
  • Refer to the book to check the retelling or summarization

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

  • Take a family field trip to a museum. There is plenty of reading to do as you explore the various exhibits. Take turns reading the signs.
  • Take a family field trip to the beach or forest. Bring a field guide with you and when you find interesting plants or wildlife, read about them.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Make sure you have plenty of books on hand at various levels, including those above your child's reading ability. If your child wants to read those challenging books, read with them. You read a page, and then point to words or phrases for them to read. Alternate reading sections, or pages as they progress. As long as the story is engaging and you are helping, those big books can get tackled!


april.jpg

FLUENCY:

Prefixes and Suffixes - Have your child practice reading words with common prefixes and suffixes. Write the words on two index cards and play Go Fish, Old Maid, Memory and practice with flashcards. See your teacher for an appropriate list.

DECODING DIFFICULT WORDS:

Look for Chunks in the Word

Look for familiar letter chunks. They may be sound/symbols, prefixes, suffixes, endings, whole words, or base words. Read each chunk by itself. Then blend the chunks together and sound out the word. Does that word make sense in the sentence?

Connect to a Word You Know

Think of a word that looks like the unfamiliar word. Compare the familiar word to the unfamiliar word. Decide if the familiar word is a chunk or form of the unfamiliar word. Use the known word in the sentence to see if it makes sense. If so, the meanings of the two words are close enough for understanding.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

• Get cooking. Invite your child to help you bake a cake or a special meal together. If necessary, simplify and rewrite a recipe's instructions so he can read it to you. Also try kid cookbooks like The Magic Spoon, which has fun recipes and entertaining directions for her to read.

• Create signs and lists. Chores, daily schedules, and activities can all be posted in a place where your child can easily find them. When they ask about the day's plan, direct her toward the schedule or list to read and find out for herself.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Notice patterns. If your child repeats the same kinds of errors frequently, mention this to the teacher. A pattern of similar mistakes may be a sign of trouble. The teacher can help determine if there is an issue that needs more attention.


may.jpg


FLUENCY:

Read the Room - Have some fun and write words on post-it notes and place them around the house at eye level for your child. Time him as he reads the words around the room. See if he can beat his time.

DECODING DIFFICULT WORDS

Reread the Sentence

Read the sentence more than once. Think about what word might make sense in the sentence. Try the word and see if the sentence makes sense.

Keep Reading

Read past the unfamiliar word and look for clues. If the word is repeated, compare the second sentence to the first. What word might make sense in both?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

  • Mommy's (or Daddy's) Little Helper. Have your child create and read to you the grocery or shopping list. If you create a to-do list for a busy day, have your child keep track of what's been done and what's left to do.
  • Video Store (or On Demand, RedBox, or Netflix). When having a family movie night, have your child read the descriptions of the movies before coming to a decision about what to watch.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Set a Timer If your child is starting to tire of reading aloud to you, set a timer. Have him read alone for 10 minutes. Check in and have him read to you his favorite part. Set the timer for another ten minutes and repeat.


Documents to Support Literacy at Home

Building a Reader at Home

Writing at Home

Building Writing Skills


Supporting Literacy at Home


september.jpg

FLUENCY:

Echo reading - You read one line, and have the child echo the same line immediately after. As your child's reading improves, increase the number of lines read at one time. Ask your child to follow the print by using their finger to make sure the words are followed with their eyes.

COMPREHENSION:

Make Connections to what you're reading. Whether you're reading aloud to your child, or they are reading aloud to you, making connections is a great way to work on comprehending what they read. In school we focus on three kinds of connections: text-to-text, text-to-self, and text-to-world.

Ask your child:

Does this story remind you of another book we've read? How are they similar?
How is this character like you? How is this situation like one you have experienced?
How is this like something that happened in real life? How is this like something we heard on the news?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Play board games. Scrabble or Boggle are specifically good for building vocabulary and spelling, but most games include reading opportunities, including kid versions of Trivial Pursuit, Monopoly, and Clue.

Collect trading cards. There are card series to appeal to most interests, from sports to space travel, Yu-Gi-Oh! to Beanie Babies. Most include facts that encourage kids to read more about their hobbies.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Bite your tongue most of the time. If your child is making it through most words, but doing it at a snail's pace, be patient and let her carry on. She needs the practice. Frequent interruptions can interfere with comprehension (and the pleasure of reading).


october.jpg

FLUENCY:

Sight words - Children who have a large vocabulary of sight words have an advantage. Practice sight words from the Fry list (available from your teacher). Write each word on two index cards. Play Go Fish, Old Maid, or Memory. Quiz your child with flashcards.

COMPREHENSION:

Questioning - Proficient readers are always asking questions while they read. Questions help students clarify and deepen understaning of the text they are reading.

Before Reading - Have your child think about what predictions they have for the story. What do they think the story is about?

During Reading - Have your child think of questions to ask that begin with "I wonder..." or ask about information that may br confusing. Then, determine if the answer can be found in the text, the picture, with prior knowledge, by researching or by making an inference.

After Reading - Give your child the opportunity to ask any clarifying questions about the story.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Make Cards. Have your child make her own cards for holidays, birthdays, party invitations, and thank-yous. Help her write a personal message to each recepient.

Write messages for your child. Even if you spend hours together in the same room, there are many reasons to write to your child. Drop a letter in her school bag or e-mail her a joke she can forward to her friends. Post a list of chores on the refrigerator and write family news or appointments on a wall calendar.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Speak up for sense. An exception to the stay-mum rule: Gently correct your child if he alters the meaning of a sentence by skipping or substituting an important word.


november.jpg

FLUENCY:

Re-reading - Student benefit from reading stories over and over. The Dr. Seuss books are great for this, though any favourite book, words to a song or poem will do. Try reading using different voices for the characters, or in silly voices.

COMPREHENSION:

Visualizing - Mental pictures are the cinema unfolding in your mind that make reading three-dimensional. Visualization helps readers engage with text in ways that make it personal and memorable. Readers adapt their images as they continue to read.

As you read aloud to your child, have them stop and make a mental picture of an aspect of the story. They can share what they visualize.

Ask you child what they imagine as you read. Try to incoporate the five senses.

What do you hear? Smell? See? Feel? Taste?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Learn how to... Is there something your child would realy like to do, such as perform magic tricks or add sequins to her jeans? Encourage her to find out how by reading about it. She can read instructions in do-it-yourself kits or download information from the Web, them look for related books.

Take a road trip. Write down travel directions and have your child serve as navigator when you drive.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Help with stumpers. If your child encounters a new, difficult word that is key to understanding the sentence or passage he's reading, or that recurs frequently, step in to pronounce and define it for him.


december.jpg

FLUENCY:

Books on Tape - These can be a great way to provide examples of fluent reading. When using a taped story, make sure your child has the book at hand, adn have them follow along with their finger or read along to help with fluency. Have your child tape their own stories and evaluate their reading for fluency.

Making Inferences is usually referred to as "reading between the lines". This strategy involves:

  • Formating a best guess using evidence - context clues, picture clues, etc.
  • Making predictions
  • Drawing conclusions
  • Finding meaning of unknown words
  • Ask: What do you think the means" Why would the character do that?

Put on a play. You can perform the play for a special celebration or family party. Help your child find an appealing script or create on together based on a favourite movie. Print out copies, recruit other children or family members to act, and make costumes. Remind your child that he must memorize his lines by reading them over and over.Tips for Listening to Your Child Read:

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Answer appeals. When she ask for help, give it. Encourage her to figure words out on her own, but if she's genuinely stumped, come to her aid so she doesn't get frustrated.


january.jpg

FLUENCY:

Memorize a Poem-Find a favorite poem that you and your child enjoy. Shel Silverstein is a favorite author for many children. Read and reread the poem until it is memorized. Focus on expression, phrasing, and reading at an appropriate pace.

COMPREHENSION:

Determining Importance: People are bombarded daily with information. Knowing the purpose for reading helps determine what's important. Reader's need to distinguish between:

  • Fiction and nonfiction
  • Important from unimportant information

Activities:

  • Ask your child to think of another title for the story (it should have to do with the main idea)
  • Try to recall 3-5 facts after reading
  • Write a list of important words relating to the story or information

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Get a magazine subscription or check out magazines from the library. Highlights for Children, My Big Back Yard, Chickadee, Discovery Kids, National Geographic Kids, Ranger Rick, and Sports Illustrated Kids are magazines that are popular amongst children 6-9 years old.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Encore! When he finishes a passage or a story, ask him to read it again. Your interest is a confidence-booster, and the extra practice with familiar text will also boost both his skills and his self-esteem.


february.jpg

FLUENCY:

Expressive Reading - Find a song or poem that your child enjoys. Have him read the lyrics or words with as much expression as possible. Think about which words need emphasis. Look carefully and determine what kinds of punctuation could go in the song or poem (if it's not there already). Use the punctuation to help determine how to read the song or poem.

COMPREHENSION:

Making Predications helps your child engage in the material and keeps him interested.

Before Reading ask your child what they think the story is about. Have them look at the cover, do a "picture walk" through the pages, examine the table of contents, maps, diagrams and features. What does he think will happen in the story?

During Reading have your child continually think about what will happen next. It's okay if the prediction is incorrect. It's okay to revise predictions as the story continues.

After Reading determine if the predications were correct. Remember, it's okay if they weren't!

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Be a drama queen. When you're the one doing the reading, use lots of expression. Really put on a show! This will encourage your child to do the same when she reads. If she can, you'll know she's understanding the words she's reading, and not simply parroting them mindlessly.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

Plan an event. For example, have your child help plan a party or trip. They can look in catalogues or travel guides for ideas for the event. Have them create lists of important things they need to buy or bring along.


march.jpg

FLUENCY:

If you have practiced sight words and done fluency work with your child, but they continue to stumble over the same words or read word-by-word with simple texts, please speak with your teacher. There may an issue that needs further investigation and considerations.

COMPREHENSION:

Summarizing the text in their own words clears up language issues. Retelling challenges them to aim for complete retention. Summarization allows students to discriminate between the main ideas and the minor details. Ask your child:

  • During reading, note the main ideas or events
  • At the end of chapters or sections, review the information or story. Note the main ideas or events and the details that support them.
  • After reading, retell or summarize the text. Focus on the important points, and support them with relevant details.
  • Refer to the book to check the retelling or summarization

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

  • Take a family field trip to a museum. There is plenty of reading to do as you explore the various exhibits. Take turns reading the signs.
  • Take a family field trip to the beach or forest. Bring a field guide with you and when you find interesting plants or wildlife, read about them.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Make sure you have plenty of books on hand at various levels, including those above your child's reading ability. If your child wants to read those challenging books, read with them. You read a page, and then point to words or phrases for them to read. Alternate reading sections, or pages as they progress. As long as the story is engaging and you are helping, those big books can get tackled!


april.jpg

FLUENCY:

Prefixes and Suffixes - Have your child practice reading words with common prefixes and suffixes. Write the words on two index cards and play Go Fish, Old Maid, Memory and practice with flashcards. See your teacher for an appropriate list.

DECODING DIFFICULT WORDS:

Look for Chunks in the Word

Look for familiar letter chunks. They may be sound/symbols, prefixes, suffixes, endings, whole words, or base words. Read each chunk by itself. Then blend the chunks together and sound out the word. Does that word make sense in the sentence?

Connect to a Word You Know

Think of a word that looks like the unfamiliar word. Compare the familiar word to the unfamiliar word. Decide if the familiar word is a chunk or form of the unfamiliar word. Use the known word in the sentence to see if it makes sense. If so, the meanings of the two words are close enough for understanding.

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

• Get cooking. Invite your child to help you bake a cake or a special meal together. If necessary, simplify and rewrite a recipe's instructions so he can read it to you. Also try kid cookbooks like The Magic Spoon, which has fun recipes and entertaining directions for her to read.

• Create signs and lists. Chores, daily schedules, and activities can all be posted in a place where your child can easily find them. When they ask about the day's plan, direct her toward the schedule or list to read and find out for herself.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Notice patterns. If your child repeats the same kinds of errors frequently, mention this to the teacher. A pattern of similar mistakes may be a sign of trouble. The teacher can help determine if there is an issue that needs more attention.


may.jpg


FLUENCY:

Read the Room - Have some fun and write words on post-it notes and place them around the house at eye level for your child. Time him as he reads the words around the room. See if he can beat his time.

DECODING DIFFICULT WORDS

Reread the Sentence

Read the sentence more than once. Think about what word might make sense in the sentence. Try the word and see if the sentence makes sense.

Keep Reading

Read past the unfamiliar word and look for clues. If the word is repeated, compare the second sentence to the first. What word might make sense in both?

NON-BOOK READING ACTIVITIES:

  • Mommy's (or Daddy's) Little Helper. Have your child create and read to you the grocery or shopping list. If you create a to-do list for a busy day, have your child keep track of what's been done and what's left to do.
  • Video Store (or On Demand, RedBox, or Netflix). When having a family movie night, have your child read the descriptions of the movies before coming to a decision about what to watch.

TIPS FOR LISTENING TO YOUR CHILD READ:

Set a Timer If your child is starting to tire of reading aloud to you, set a timer. Have him read alone for 10 minutes. Check in and have him read to you his favorite part. Set the timer for another ten minutes and repeat.


Documents to Support Literacy at Home

Building a Reader at Home

Writing at Home

Building Writing Skills